DEVELOPMENT

Globally, people are congregating along coasts and their impact will continue to rise. A gross analysis of how many people are affected by erosion/SLR has been given by theWorld ResourcesInstitute (2010). Within 25 km of the coastline live 1.4 billion people, (20% of the world population); 2.8 billion (i.e.40%)within less than 100 km in a coastal strip covering 20% of the global land surface. With SLR, damage to coastal infrastructures will invariably rise. 

Unsustainable development's impact on small-scale fisheries:

  • Tourism

  • Coastal Cities

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TOURISM'S IMPACT ON SMALL-SCALE FISHERIES

The main causes, which tourism sector can impair coastal ecosystem, are direct discharge of untreated sewage into the ocean or disposal of large quantities of solid waste on the coast instead of a proper treatment. Moreover, some typical activities there such as tourist yachts, motor boats and cruise ships are also the main source of oil contaminants for the sea. Further, high consumer of natural resources due to tourist’s demands can worsen the lack of fresh water, which already known as an extremely scare resource in virtually coastal areas and high demand of seafood may lead to overfishing situation in destination, too. Finally clearing natural habitats such as cutting down mangroves, damage coral reefs; removal sand, and so on all contribute to coastal habitat degradation (UNEP 2009: 14; UNEP 2006: 14-15).

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CULTURAL EROSION

Cá Ông worship is believed to have been formed a long time ago when a whale rescued villagers from a monster who was terrorizing the people. Because of the heroic act of the whale, the ancestors of the villagers started to worship the whale, using its carcass and bones in temples.

VIDEO: 

  • A stop-motion animation made by a group of local kids about the reason people workshop the whales.

  • Interviews with keepers of the whale temple in Mui Ne, Vang Tau, and Hue.

  • Interview with Long Vu about the links between whale workshop and the conservation of marine mammals, i.e. generational gap.

 

GHOSTS AT "THE END OF THE WORLD"

The graveyard at the coastal headland overlooking an island (where a man they call the Sea Devil lives) is scheduled to be "demolished" to make way for more hotels and resorts. What's the impact? Who cares? Do humans still have rights after they die?

CULTURAL EROSION

Cá Ông worship is believed to have been formed a long time ago when a whale rescued villagers from a monster who was terrorizing the people. Because of the heroic act of the whale, the ancestors of the villagers started to worship the whale, using its carcass and bones in temples.

VIDEO: 

  • A stop-motion animation made by a group of local kids about the reason people workshop the whales.

  • Interviews with keepers of the whale temple in Mui Ne, Vang Tau, and Hue.

  • Interview with Long Vu about the links between whale workshop and the conservation of marine mammals, i.e. generational gap.

FISHING TRADITION IN VIETNAM'S ERA OF modernization

Vietnam aims to become a modernized nation by 2030, with industrial sector that constituting 40 percent of the nation’s GDP. 

 

As many small-scale fishery activities are often informal, their activities are not always captured by official statistics. The benefits and contributions from traditional fishing as a sector are therefore lost and the fishers invisible. As Vietnam continues to prioritize industrialization growth with coastal megacities like Ho Chi Minh and Danang, the focus is on empowering a sea-based economy. However, instead of counting the contribution that small-scale fisheries add to the economy and creating policies that would support local livelihoods and food security, officials aim to switch from traditional fishing to modern and sustainable methods which use advanced technologies. 

Vietnamese industries have for years focused on quantity instead of quality, and three factors have marked this: (1) a persistent focus on processing – manufacturing; (2)unrestrained export of raw materials; and (3) unbridled expansion of heavy industries with high electricity usage.

 

These labor-intensive, resource-consuming industrial activities are undertaken by developing nations with low labor skills. They yield insignificant benefits compared to the high costs exacted.